Ports of Call

Luxury destinations

Explore our ports of call, where you can walk, shop, and dine in Caribbean paradises!

Ft. Lauderdale, FL

There is an abundance of things to see and do in the Fort Lauderdale area: visit the newly redesigned Fort Lauderdale Beach and cafes, stroll the historic Riverwalk, shop the luxurious stores on Las Olas Boulevard or venture to the Everglades for an intriguing air boat excursion.



Philipsburg, St. Maarten

This Leeward Island has been famously bisected into French and Dutch territories since 1648, and is referred to both as Saint Martin and Sint Maarten. In their respective capitals—Marigot and Philipsburg—there are ancient stone forts and candy-colored buildings lining winding streets. The Dutch side has a slightly larger population but is a bit smaller, at 34 square kilometers (13 square miles), versus the 53-square-kilometer (20-square-mile) Saint Martin.  Named for its founder John Philips, Philipsburg, the capital of the Dutch side, has some excellent international art galleries, thumping discos and popular casinos. Farther afield are beautiful beaches and a seemingly endless array of nature conservancies. With them come extensive opportunities for adventure—hiking, biking and zip lining—and amazing wildlife sightings in the sea, on land and in the sky.  On the French side, there are cafés serving café au lait and pain au chocolate and sidewalk bistros offering chilled rosé and savory crepes. A variety of luxury shops and cosmopolitan boutiques beckon to sophisticated shoppers who love a good bargain—the entire island has no sales tax.



St. John’s, Antigua and Barbuda

The former British colony of Antigua is something special. Just ask Richard Branson, Eric Clapton, Giorgio Armani and Oprah—they all have homes here. Known for its beaches—there are 365 of them, all white sand lined with palm trees—Antigua also boasts charming harbors and a countryside dotted with old sugar mills. At one time the island was a juggernaut in the sugar trade, and also produced tobacco and cotton. Today, agriculture is still important, with Antiguan sweet potatoes, black pineapples and guavas being among the major crops. The capital city of the dual-island nation of Antigua and Barbuda is St. John's, the center of commerce, with international banks and boutiques as well as a lone rum distillery. Elsewhere on Antigua, English Harbour is of particular note for its maritime heritage, historic sites and excellent restaurants—plus, while there, you'll get to glimpse some impressive yachts as they sail in and out of the bay. The highlight is the restored Nelson’s Dockyard, which features gorgeous 18th- and 19th-century architecture but also buzzes with modern eateries and shops.